Artist

45 AND COUNTING

 

As a child I recognised that I wanted to be an artist. That led to weekend art classes,

completing school level art at a young age and consequently attending art school part

time at night with adults. My career took various directions before settling into glass

some 45 years ago, [well 46 by the time of .....

45 AND COUNTING

 

As a child I recognised that I wanted to be an artist. That led to weekend art classes,

completing school level art at a young age and consequently attending art school part

time at night with adults. My career took various directions before settling into glass

some 45 years ago, [well 46 by the time of the opening of the ’47th’].

 

I initially imagined that my career as an artist might be likened to a straight line on a page,

starting at one side and progressing as the years passed towards the other. [Hopefully

depicting an incline as I became more able.] With reflection I have come to realise that

my life as an artist might be better depicted with an ellipse. On occasion I return to a

series many years after considering it complete, the longest absence being 15 years.

This has brought me to the understanding that as an artist I can never be sure that an

individual work or series is ever complete. There must of course be a stopping point for

without that the artist has nothing to show.

 

The stopping point in my case is the date of an appointment with the photographer.

Invariably I curse him for if I just had one more day, one more hour I could make the work

bigger, better, more bold, more subtle, trim off an edge that isn’t really contributing

to the composition to the extent that it might, etc, etc, etc. [Did Michelangelo ever look

up and think, ‘that finger, perhaps a little closer’?]

 

Of course I set the time of the photo shoot, it isn’t really the photographer who limits me,

it is a natural consequence of the process. Might this be a difference between art and craft?

A craftwork can unambiguously be finished. An artwork might be always open to further consideration by the artist. Frequently an artwork can’t actually be reworked as technically it is impossible but also as the artist may need to see it in the current state so as to refine the conception of the desired advancements.

 

Hence, the series! To make one work is like hitting a ball against the wall.  To make a series is like competing with someone across the net.

 

My mind races with ideas for future works, whole series are imagined before the first is completed. The self discipline required is to not start so many ideas that none can be adequately resolved. A series may be likened to having another child. There is an emotional involvement. To start a new series is for me a little akin to having a favourite child. Indulgence in the new series feels to some extent a betrayal of the earlier works.

 

Such are the anxieties that bedevil me.

Join us!

Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
47th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: Saturday, May 4th at 8:00pm | Exhibition: May 4th – July 5th