Artist

When asked to let our audience into “A Day in the Life” of whom I am?

I respond by saying:

I am…. “No Stranger to Tedium”

I’d like to reflect and expand somewhat, on a comment I made a number of years ago for the 40th International Invitational referencing time spent in Japan and observing some cultural differences .....

When asked to let our audience into “A Day in the Life” of whom I am?

I respond by saying:

I am…. “No Stranger to Tedium”

I’d like to reflect and expand somewhat, on a comment I made a number of years ago for the 40th International Invitational referencing time spent in Japan and observing some cultural differences and similarities.   In observing, working and living in Japan, one of the devices that I used for my own curiosity, was to ask a question about idioms that the Japanese had that might be the same or different as sayings we have in the west. I.e. “a stitch in time…. saves nine”, etc.   One student offered that the Japanese had similar sayings but the meaning may be quite different.  How is this I asked?? Is there an example?? For example, the student said,  “A rolling stone gathers no moss”.  In American western culture she offered, the “rolling stone” is significant as it is deemed important to not be tied down.  In Japan the “Moss” is important as it signifies a depth of commitment, not only in work, but in relationships.

The Amish have a similar saying, “Learn one thing well…. others will follow”.   This thoughtful saying can be applied to the worth of our daily activities in play, work.

I have learned that I’m drawn to philosophical ideals that support the long lasting, slow and steady “tortoise and the hair” approach to living.  Studio work is a reflection of this and has been long, steady, studied and hopefully enduring. I’ve always been this way and can cite that even as an undergrad I was not the student that stayed up all night at finals but rather started early, worked hard and steady and when final critiques (the equivalent of exams for art studio practice) were approaching, I would have been more or less ready, often weeks ahead, leaving time for other possibly significant details to be taken care of.

One can hopefully see these philosophies when viewing or experiencing the Matrix Series, it’s evolution from piece to piece and how the series has diverged from the other bodies of work that I have done. Countless hours in researching ideas, constantly observing our surroundings, working through concepts, developing thought, selecting design, engineering a way to build, and then of course, in the actual construction of each piece, to me is time well spent.

Brent Kee Young March 2019

Join us!

Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
47th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: Saturday, May 4th at 8:00pm | Exhibition: May 4th – July 5th